Take Control of Inclement Weather with a Plan

How prepared are your employees and organization to navigate the next major blizzard?

If you don’t know how you will keep employees informed and safe while you maintain business continuity, you can do more.

Imagine your employees waking up in the morning after a snowstorm has hit. The Weather Channel details the icy roads and slippery streets. Social media is crowded with photos and updates of vehicles buried in the snow and children celebrating the snow day. But what about work? Your employees must decide if they should brave the hazardous roads or stay home and potentially miss a workday. With no incoming messages and calls that lead only to voicemail, your employees become confused and frustrated.

Keep in mind that if your employees don’t know what to do in the event of a snow or ice storm, they can put themselves at risk. They may attempt to report to work but find the office closed. Alternatively, they could get into an accident on the way. Please don’t put them, or yourself, in that position.

Ensure that your organization includes weather-related emergencies in its continuity plans. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation notes that “Disasters are not a matter of if, but when. This is why every business owner, no matter the business size, needs to develop a disaster plan now.”1

Establish or hone your inclement weather plan to avoid employee frustration and hazardous situations. A well-devised inclement weather plan can also save your business from potential consequences that vary from low employee morale to injuries and lawsuits.

The Ultimate Guide to Inclement Weather Planning: Every Incident Requires a Unique Response

Enhance your organization’s inclement weather plan with more information and critical steps from this guide. Download The White Paper »

Create Your Plan with These Best Practices

The better your communication plan, the better your organization can navigate inclement weather. Your plan should include various methods of notification for weather emergencies, including desktop alerts, instant messaging, social media, emails, and mobile apps. You can be sure your organization is ready to weather any storm by incorporating some of these best practices:

  • Establish and understand designated roles. To avoid any confusion when carrying out a weather-related emergency plan, create internal emergency-response teams.
  • Detail the steps that must be taken for each weather scenario. Protocols for a snow storm should include safely clearing snow and ice from the buildings, ensuring that all emergency vehicles are equipped with fuel, and stocking the premises with rock salt, snow-removal equipment, and sand.
  • Maintain an updated list of contact information for all response-team personnel, employees, utility companies, FEMA, the local Red Cross chapter and local first responder organizations. Keep this information up-to-date to ensure that you can reach all responders and points of contact as quickly as possible.
  • Conduct drills. Once there is an established plan for inclement weather, it is vital to practice the protocol and procedures with staff periodically. Drills will keep the procedures fresh in your employees’ minds so that all personnel know what to do in a weather-related emergency.

If you don’t have an effective inclement weather plan, you are setting up your employees and organization for unnecessary confusion, frustration, and operational lapses. With a weather-related plan in motion, you may rest assured that your organization and employees will be prepared for anything this winter season. 

Enhance your organization’s inclement weather plan with more information and critical steps from this guide:

The Ultimate Guide to Inclement Weather Planning: Every Incident Requires a Unique Response

Enhance your organization’s inclement weather plan with more information and critical steps from this guide.

Download The White Paper